Medieval Combat Society

Amanda Newman

Amanda Newman

Illuminated C Smalloney in Onyon Cevy

1 rabbit, whole or cut up

3-4 onions, sliced or chopped

2 tbsp. cooking fat

2 slices bread (wholemeal) toasted

1 cup chicken stock

1 cup red wine

tsp mace

¼ tsp ginger

¼ tsp pepper

Pinch of ground cloves

Salt to taste

1 tbsp. wine vinegar

Chopped parsley to garnish

Take cony (or mallard or henne) and rost them til they be almost enoughe, or els chope them and fry them in freche grece; and fry onyons minced and put them in a pot an cast ther to freche brothe and half wyne, clowes, maces, pouder of guinger and pepper, and draw it with venygar; and when it is boild cast therto thy licour and pouder of guingere and venygar and sesson it, and serve it.

Roast meat until brown, then cut up, or brown pieces of meat in the fat. When it is sufficiently brown, add onions to the pan and cook until soft.

Meanwhile, soak toast in the stock, and blend into a smooth sauce. Combine wine, vinegar and spices. Add the toast-thickened stock to the meat and onion mixture, along with the wine, vinegar and spices.

Let the meat simmer in this sauce until done, or long enough for the flavours to blend. (30 minutes for pieces browned in fat, and 10-15 minutes for roasted meat.

When determining the final cooking time err on the side of caution this is one dish which is not harmed by overcooking.

If your taste does not stretch to rabbit the recipe works equally well with duck or chicken

Illuminated B Smalleef Bokenade

2-3lbs beef, cut into cubes

1 tsp sage

½ tsp cloves

4 egg yokes

½ tsp ginger

1 pinch saffron

1 tbsp. parsley

1 tsp hyssop

¼ tsp mace

½ cup verjuice

1 tsp salt

Take fayre beef of the rybbys of the fore quarterys, boyle hem in faire water or ells in good fressh broth, and smyte hem in peces, and pike hem clene; And drawe the same broth through a streynour, And cast there-to parcelly, isoppe, sauge, maces and clowes. And lete boyle til the flessh be ynogh; and then set hit fro the fire, and aley hit up with rawe yokes of eyren, and caste thereto pouder ginger, and vergeous, and a little saffron and salte, and ceson hit vppe and serve it forth.

Put the beef into a large pot along with water to cover – about 8 cups. Bring to a boil, raise pot / reduce heat, and simmer for 30 minutes. Skim off and discard any scum that forms on the surface. Add parsley, sage, hyssop, cloves and mace. Stir well and simmer for another 30 minutes, or until the beef is tender.

Temper the egg yolks in a separate bowl by slowly whisking in a cup or two of the broth from the pot. Add the remaining ingredients to the pot along with the egg mixture and stir. Remove from the heat and serve as soon as it comes back to the boil.

If hyssop is unavailable leave it out. Verjuice can be simulated with ½ cup wine & ⅛ cup lemon juice

Illuminated P Smallygges in Sawse Sawge

2 lbs Cold boiled (or roast) pork (or chicken)

2 tbsp. dried sage

1-2 tsp chopped parsley

4 hard-boiled eggs

¼ cup vinegar (white wine, cider or malt)

½ tsp salt

⅛ - ¼ tsp ground ginger

Pepper, galigale, cloves and / or cinnamon as required

Take pigs yskaldid and quarter hem and seep hem in water and salt, taken hem and lat hem kele. Take good spices, that is, gyinger, cloves, cinnamon, and galingale, and grind well in the same mortar with the spices; then take eggs and hardboil them; remove the yolk and grind with the sage; blend with wyne vinegar; take the egg white and chop finely and add to the mixture. Lay the pyggees in a vessell, and the sewe onoward and serve it forth

Separate yolks and whites of boiled eggs. Blend the yolks, sage, parsley, vinegar and seasonings. Separately chop the white as finely as possible; stir into the yolk mixture, and if it seems too thick, and a little more vinegar. Arrange the meat on a suitable serving dish and pour the sauce around it.

The French versions of this cold dish usually specify chicken rather than the English pork. Most such recipes do not call for as many spices; all but the ginger can be safely omitted.

Illuminated S Smallalomene

4 fish fillets (ideally perch, trout or roach)

½ Cup red wine

½ Cup water

Cup sugar

½ tsp powder fine

½ slice bread, crumbed

Olive oil

Mace

Cloves

Pepper

Salt

Take gode wyne, an gode pouder & bread y-ground, an sugre, an boyle it y-fere; than take Trowtys, Rochys, Perchys, other Carpys, other alle these y-fere, an make hem clene, & aftere roste hem on a grydelle; than hewe hem in gobettys: whan they ben         y-sothe, fry hem in oyle a lytil, then caste in the brwet; and whan thou dressist it, take Maces, Clowes, Quybibes, Gelofrys; and cast a-boue, & serve forth.

Rinse fish fillets, place in a baking bowl and bake in a covered pot for 15-20 minutes.

Put wine, water, bread crumbs and fine spice powder in pan and bring to the boil. Lift to a medium heat and simmer for about 20 minutes.

Remove the fish from the pot and fry in a skillet in olive oil for about 10 minutes. Sprinkle with salt, pepper, cloves and mace to taste.

Serve hot topped with the sauce.

Fish dishes that will please the majority of people can be hard to find and medieval ones are even harder to come by. This recipe makes a light dish while the combination of wine and spices removes all trace of fishiness. Perfect for fussy re-enactors.

Illuminated S Smallpyced Crème of Muskels

4lb fresh mussels

1 Cup white wine

2 Shallots, finely chopped

2 Sticks of celery sliced

1oz butter for frying

4ox crème fraiche

3 tsp plain flower

Spices as available

Pepper to season

Chopped parsley, to serve

Take and seep muskels; pyke heme clene, and waisshe hem clene in wyne and boile ær þon heme ontynan and keep ye broth, drawe it þorgh a streynour. Macian doh of spice. Frye lytel oynouns and cellery, add broth, creme and doh. Hat it and add parcely and serve hem forth.

Scrub the mussels in a large bowl of cold water and remove beards, discard any that are open. Put in a large pan with the wine. Bring to the boil, cover and shake the pan over the heat until the mussels are open, normally about 3-4 minutes.

Remove the mussels and strain the cooking liquid through cloth to remove any grit. Keep the mussels warm. Make a paste with flour, spices as required or available (curry powder, and all spice are good suggestions) and a little water.

Fry the shallots and celery in the butter until softened, but not browned, stir in the paste and cook for about 1 minute. Add the cooking liquid and season with pepper. Stir in the crème fraiche add the mussels and warm through until thickened and glossy. Sprinkle with parsley and serve.

A wide range of mollusks including oysters, mussels and scallops were eaten by coastal and river-dwelling populations, and freshwater crayfish were seen as a desirable alternative to meat during fish days

Illuminated H Smallericot de Mouton

3 lb Mutton, (or stewing lamb) cut up

4 Onions, chopped

1 tbsp. lard, butter or oil (for browning)

2 cups beef broth stock

1-2 tbsp. chopped parsley

Salt to taste

½ tsp each sage, mint

¼ tsp ground mace

Cut it up in little pieces, then put it to parboil in a first water. Then fry it in fresh lard; fry it with onions minced small and cooked, and add beef boullion, and put with it maces, parsley, hyssop and sage; boil it together.

Remove bones and excess fat from meat. Brown over medium heat in a skillet, using some of the excess fat if necessary, and adding onions when meat has begun to brown. When both meat and    onions are browned enough, put in a pot with broth, herbs, salt and mace; cover and simmer.

If the sauce seems too thin, bread may be used as a thickener but it should boil down to a good consistency.

‘Hericot’ or ’Haricot’ (the title in later versions) has nothing to do with the French word meaning a bean. An alternative meaning of the word in French is stew. Latter versions of this dish, in both France and England, invariably add turnips and other vegetables as well as onions, if this is done the they should be boiled in advance of the main dish and drained before being added to the pot.

Spyced Creme of Muskels

 

Take and seep muskels; pyke heme clene, and waisshe hem clene in wyne and boile aer pon heme ontynan and keep ye broth, drawe it forgh a streynour. Macian doh of spice. Frye lytel oynouns and cellery, add broth, creme and doh. Heat it and add parcely and serve hem forth.

 

  • 4 pounds fresh mussels
  • 1 cup white wine
  • 2 Shallots, finely chopped
  • 2 Sticks of celery, sliced
  • 1 ounce of butter for frying
  • 4 ounces creme fresh
  • 3 teaspoons plain flour
  • Spices as availible
  • Pepper to season
  • Chopped parsley, to serve

 

Scrub the mussels in a large bowl of cold water and remove beards, discard any that are open. Put in a large pan with the wine. Bring to the boil, cover and shake the pan over the heat until the mussels are open, normally three to four minutes.

Remove the mussels and strain the cooking liquid through cloth to remove any grit. Keep the mussels warm. Make a paste with flour, spices as required or availible (curry powder and all spice are good suggestions) and a little water.

Fry the shallotts and celery in the butter until softened, but not browned, stir in the paste and cook for about one minute. Add the cooking liquid and season with pepper. Stir in the creme fraiche, add the mussels and warm through until thickened and glossy.

Sprinkle with parsley and serve.

 

 

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